Post Script: a symposium exploring contemporary approaches to narrative

Post_ScriptPOST SCRIPT was a symposium exploring contemporary approaches to narrative. Organized by the Piet Zwart Institute within the context of the IFFR, the Master Media Design and Communication programme, in collaboration with Creating 010. Artists and filmmakers: Smadar Dreyfus, Rick Prelinger, Pablo Sigg, and Keith Sanborn. The event was organised and edited by Edwin Carels, Florian Cramer, Simon Pummell and Renée Turner. (2014)

Significant moving-image artists and filmmakers  were invited to talk about their work and strategies of representing stories. Working with new and archival material, montage and found footage, these contemporary practitioners employ the languages of art, cinema, theatre, documentary and fiction in unexpected ways. Rather than being driven by conventional storytelling or a script, they are often non-linear, fragmentary and rely upon the viewer to lend cohesion and continuity. Gaps are not omissions, but rather choreographed spaces for projection, induced memories, and public participation. In other words, these artists not only test narrative as a variable form, but also expand the notion of spectatorship.

Speaker bios:

Smadar Dreyfus is an Israeli-born, London-based artist. She is interested in the negotiation of cultural perspectives and the ambiguity and gaps that are generated by it, while considering a socio-political context, and how it is reflected in daily life. Significant to her work is the way sound, especially the voice, ‘enacts’ the public arena, and how identity is constructed through language. Her large-scale installations emphasise a detachment of sound from image, focusing on what is left unsaid and unseen. Exhibitions include Magasin 3 Stockholm Konsthall (2009) and Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerpen (2008) and the 2011 Folkestone Triennial among others.

Rick Prelinger is an archivist, writer and filmmaker. He is best known as the founder of the Prelinger Archives, a collection of over 60,000 educational, industrial, and sponsored films acquired by the Library of Congress in 2002. His recent work No More Road Trips? is a live-performance, interactive film presentation culled from home movies of American car trips and family vacations spanning the 20th century. Like most of its source film material, Road Trips has no sound: the audience provides real-time audio commentary.

Pablo Sigg, a filmmaker and writer based in Mexico City, has dedicated the larger part of his approach to cinema to a long, slow and often unproductive research process. His first feature film (Der Wille zur Macht)—about Elisabeth Nietzsche’s Aryan colony in Paraguay, began in 2009 and was completed in 2013. Currently he is struggling to finish his second feature (I, of whom I know nothing), filmed during 2012 and 2013 in the Montreuil office and basement that 86-year-old John Calder—Samuel Beckett’s London publisher, close friend and collaborator—uses as his home today.

Keith Sanborn is a media artist and theorist based in New York. His theoretical work has featured in a range of publications such as Artforum, and books to catalogues published by MoMA, Exit Art, and the San Francisco Cinematheque. His projects have been selected for major surveys, including the Whitney Biennial, and festivals such as OVNI, and the Toronto International Film Festival. His single channel and installation works focus primarily on the re-contextualization and transformation of pre-existing images.